Category Archives: Raising Homemakers

Time to Celebrate!

Why?

 

Because RaisingHomemakers.com is turning 1!

 

I have only been writing for this site for a few short months, but, I have been a reader from the very beginning.  And, as both, I am so very thankful for the mission and purpose behind Raising Homemakers.

 

 

From the founder of Raising Homemakers, Sara Mae:

Being an intentional mama takes time, energy, and a willingness to lay down our selfish ambitions. It’s hard. So we pray each day for the grace and wisdom to continue on in faith as we raise up our babes for His glory. Thank you for walking alongside us on this motherhood journey.

 

This week, to celebrate and to say thank you, Raising Homemakers will be re-launching the site…with a (slightly) new look, a new resource page, and…some amazing giveaways!  (If you are a fan of Sally Clarkson’s books, today’s is one you won’t want to miss. Trust me.)

 

If you haven’t already, now would be a great time to check out this wonderful site, and get to know the amazing ladies behind it.  They will encourage, inspire, and yes, challenge you, as together, we seek “to teach and train our daughters in the homemaking arts to the glory of God…and to re-train ourselves!”

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Raising a Homemaker – Q&A {part 4}

I started this little “series” back in February or March to answer some of the questions I have been getting about what it means (and, perhaps, more accurately, what it does not mean) when I say I am raising a homemaker.  This is part 4.

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And, again, if you have additional questions that I do not cover here (or elsewhere), please feel free to ask – either in the comments, or by e-mail.  Honest questions and genuine curiosity are always welcome.

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What about “marketable skills”?

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photo credit: TexasFreeway.com

 

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First, I think we need to clarify what we mean by “marketable” skills?

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Are we talking about Accounting? Secretarial skills? (Maybe this would include things like: filing, phone etiquette, organization, schedule management, computer skills). Nursing or another form of medical training?  Nutrition?  Culinary arts?   A teaching credential?  Things like that?

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(This isn’t meant to be an exhaustive list.)

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Basically, I think the definition most people use when speaking of “marketable” skills, is the training, experience, and skill set(s) often required to build a resume, or to gain employment within the corporate, or business world.

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And, generally speaking (because, there are always exceptions), I don’t think that there is anything wrong with my daughter (0r any woman) learning, or gaining practical, or hands-on experience in these areas.

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But in doing so, I want her to look beyond their necessity and usefulness in the “business world.”

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For example:

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Accounting: Of course, skills, training, or a degree in this area would serve her well in a business setting.  It might even translate to a lucrative career.  But, it will also help her (and by extension her family) in wisely using the family’s finances: developing a household budget, living within their means, staying out of debt, saving, wisely investing, and giving her (or her family) the ability to financially support missionaries, or other ministries.

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Culinary arts: In our world, when this skill is employed in the home, it is not necessarily seen as a “marketable skill.”  And yet, we have entire television networks and competitions dedicated to it!  Knowing how to plan, shop, prepare, and serve a variety of healthy foods to family and friends is an invaluable skill to a homemaker.  Sure, she could be an executive chef in a 5-star restaurant.  But, why not utilize that skill and talent to serve and nourish her own family, and extending the blessing to friends through hospitality.

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Nursing/Medical Training: I’m sure any mother could tell you of the bumps, scrapes, and germs that come with the territory of small children.  Basic first aid training is a must for any mom.  And, I for one, think training as a nurse would have been incredibly helpful to my ability to calmly diagnose, or treat (minor) injuries and illnesses.  (That is, if I could handle the sight of blood and other “fluids” without passing out cold!)  But, this type of training would certainly not be wasted outside the walls of a hospital or clinic.  A woman with this type of training (be it EMT, nursing, physician’s assistant, or doctor) could also serve families in her church or neighborhood as a midwife or doula.  She could serve her community by volunteering her services at a local crisis pregnancy center performing ultrasounds, our counseling women with unexpected pregnancies, and giving them hope in the gospel.  She could offer respite to a friend caring for a chronically ill child, parent, or spouse.  And, these skills can certainly be of use on the mission field (both short- and long-term): offering basic medical services, diagnoses and treatments, vaccines, and ongoing education and training in areas of health, hygiene, and disease prevention.

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Secretarial Skills: Yes, she may make a great assistant to someone!  (And, in many companies, executive assistants can make good money.)  But, couldn’t she also utilize these skills to help her husband and children by:  maintaining an accurate and orderly filing system for bills, tax forms, medical records, important documents (passports, social security cards, birth certificates), and other necessary paperwork; representing the family well in correspondence and phone communication; keeping track of multiple schedules, appointments, meetings, events, games, practices, and other family commitments – to name just a few.  Maybe these skills could be used in a family-owned, or home-based business.  Or, she could use it (once again) to bless her local church by: volunteering to answer phones, sending out correspondence, organizing an office, library, or filing system; creating and maintaining a church directory or calendar of events.

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Teaching:  I do not believe that a mother needs a state-certified credential to teach her own children.  (But, I am not naïve.  I realize that our government may someday require it!)  But, at the same time, I want her to be competent to do so!  I want her to develop a life-long love of learning – for herself, and so that she can teach her own children someday.  Of course, a woman who has spent a concentrated amount of time and study on subjects like Chemistry, Physics, Calculus, or specific eras of history, or a particular author or genre of literature may be of great help not only to her own children, but also to others who do not have her level of specific training (maybe tutoring, or teaching a homeschool co-op class).

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Again, this is not meant to be an exhaustive list.  It is just a small sample of the skills that the world would consider “marketable” which can also be learned, and utilized within the home.

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Raising a daughter to be a homemaker does not mean that she will never develop, or be exposed to skills that would be considered useful for employment or a vocation outside the home.  It just means that we (as a family) view and value those skills not for their marketability in the business world, but for their ability to bless and benefit the family, the home, the church…and as a result, the culture at large.

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Did you miss {part 1}{part 2}, or {part 3}?

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Raising a Homemaker – Q&A {part 3}

This is the third in a “series” of questions and answers clarifying what it means (and, perhaps, more accurately, what it does not mean) when I say I am raising a homemaker.

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But, what if marriage and/or a family is not God’s will or plan for her?

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Let’s clear one thing up right away.  By training my daughter to be a homemaker, I am not definitively stating that it is, without question, God’s will for her to marry.  While marriage is likely, it is not a given.  And, it is my prayer that she would just as passionately and joyfully use her gifts and abilities to serve the Lord as a single woman, as she would if she were married.

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I do not see in Scripture where, or how, marital status changes the call of biblical womanhood: to be modest, self-controlled, cultivating a gentle and quiet spirit, pure, kind, and working at home.  These are the qualities that are “proper for women who profess godliness.”  Whether she is married or single, I still believe that she needs to be cultivating a willing heart of service and love for her family and her home.

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Whether she remains single, or whether she some day marries, I believe it is wise to utilize this too-brief time  of childhood and young-adulthood to develop the skills necessary to managing a home. (This would include, but of course, is not limited to: cooking, meal planning, cleaning, organization, grocery shopping, budgeting…etc.)

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But, at the same time, I also want her to use these years to further develop interests or abilities in other areas as well: music, art, sewing, decorating, literature, nouthetic counseling, accounting, logic, history, science, politics, world events…to name a few.  I want her to represent her family, and her Lord well – both inside her home, and in the community and culture at large.  I want her to be able to engage others in intelligent, coherent, and articulate conversation and debate.

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Marital, family, or employment status aside, my hope is that she will use the skills that she is learning in our home, in concert with the unique abilities and talents that God has given her, to create a welcoming and inviting place where she can bless, minister to, and encourage her family and friends!

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Coming up next…

“Marketable” Skills

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Did you miss {part 1} or {part 2}?

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And, again, if you have additional questions that I do not cover here (or elsewhere), please feel free to ask – either in the comments, or by e-mail.  Honest questions and genuine curiosity are welcome.

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Raising a Homemaker – Q&A {part 2}

The second installment in a “series” of questions and answers clarifying what it means (and, perhaps, more accurately, what it does not mean) when I say I am raising a homemaker.

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What about college, and higher education?

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photo credit: eastcupcakehigh.com

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Although it is clearly stated here, in the interest of full disclosure, and to avoid any possible confusion, I will say it again.  Yes, I went to college.  (A wonderful, Christian, liberal arts college that, at this point in time, I would have no qualms about sending my daughter to.)  I have a Bachelor of Arts degree.  I even started work on a Master of Arts in Biblical Counseling (which I quit when my daughter was born).  And, I am so thankful for the education (both academic and spiritual) that I received.

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Did I “waste” the time, the money spent, the education itself, or the degree, because I am now “just” a homemaker? Absolutely not.

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My degree is in Biblical Studies, with an emphasis in Christian Education.  And, I have found it to be extremely useful in my everyday life as a (pastor’s) wife and (homeschooling) mother.  The Lord used my time at college, and this course of study, to increase my passion for His Word, to strengthen my desire to share His Truth with others, and to shape my worldview…strengthening, and laying the foundation for many of my convictions today!

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But, I expect that had I majored in business, or history, or science, many of the lessons learned from those disciplines would be equally useful as well.

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That being said…

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College is not out of the question.  I just do not believe that it has to be the only answer to that question.

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In some cases, though maybe not necessary, a college education (and degree) may be beneficial.  But, not in the sense of having something on which to fall back, should that worst-case-scenario come to pass.

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However, I do not think that it should be, nor does it need to be the ultimate focus and goal of my daughter’s education.

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We, as her parents, do not want to put her in a position to cultivate desires, or to pursue opportunities that will distract from or contradict Scripture’s calling for her, as a woman.

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And, yes, I realize that this is an extremely unpopular stance in today’s feminist culture.

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Coming up next…

But, what if marriage and/or a family is not God’s will or plan for her?

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Did you miss {part 1}?

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And, again, if you have additional questions that I do not cover here (or elsewhere), please feel free to ask – either in the comments, or by e-mail.  Honest questions and genuine curiosity are welcome.

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Raising a Homemaker – Q&A {part 1}

When I originally posted about my involvement with Raising Homemakers (here), I expected (and received) a few raised eyebrows and skeptical comments.

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Then I actually wrote a post for the site.

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And, I received several sweet and encouraging comments. (Thank you!)  But, I also received several e-mails.  These were full of questions.  But, instead of critical skepticism, these seemed to be rooted in more genuine curiosity.  (I could be reading them wrong, but that is how I chose to interpret them.)

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I understand that raising my 5-year-old or, a daughter of any age for that matter, to be a homemaker may be a foreign concept to some.  I just did not realize just how widespread the confusion, or curiosity would be.

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The questions ranged from “how/why did you decided to do this?” (which, I believe I answered here), to some who wanted clarification of what that does, or will mean for day-to-day life, or what it will look like, practically, in the future.

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So, I thought it might be helpful to post some of my answers to the more popular questions here, in case you were also wondering some of the same things…but didn’t want to ask.

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In an effort not to overwhelm you, I will be posting one question and answer at a time, over the next few days.  Some of the questions, and therefore the resulting answers, were of a more personal nature, so I am not going to post all of the questions I received.  Just the ones that seemed to be the most common, or frequently asked.

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And, if you have a question that I don’t answer here… Please, feel free to ask!

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Let’s just go ahead and start with question number 1:

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Are you suggesting that homemakers/Christian women are, or should be ignorant, or uneducated?

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No. Not at all.

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I believe that there should be a connection between the pursuit of spiritual, doctrinal, and theological excellence and academic excellence.  And, I believe that Christians (of either gender) should be among the greatest thinkers, and philosophers, and apologists, and scholars of our day!

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So, lest you get the wrong idea, Yes! I want my daughter to be well-educated.

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But, that being said, I do not believe that education is a means to an end, or an end to be pursued in and of itself.

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So, her education will include instruction and training in practical domestic tasks, but not to the exclusion of other academic pursuits.

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Should the Lord will for her to marry, I want my daughter to truly be a “suitable helper” for her future husband.  I want her to be interested in and knowledgeable of a variety of subjects (theology, politics, literature, history, art, music, current events, etc.) so that she can hold up her end of, not only an interesting, but intelligent conversation.  I want her to challenge her husband intellectually, and to be competent to help him analyze, consider, and think through the tough issues of life, marriage, vocation, and ministry.

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But, these same desires hold true should the Lord call her to a life of singleness.

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Because, regardless of her future (and present) marital status, I want her life, her conversation, and yes, even her intelligence to be a testimony for Christ.

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